New Chatbot Strives to Make It Easier for People to Make End of Life Decisions

Why is estate planning important for younger people?

Fewer than half of all Americans have an estate plan in place, and this number is lowest among younger individuals, according to the most recent Gallup polls. Most of us are hesitant to discuss death, which often leads to delays in estate planning. Now, two entrepreneurs are introducing a computer program that intends to make it easier for those in their 20’s, 30’s, and 40’s to make end of life plans.  

LifeFolder has introduced a free messenger chatbot named “Emily.” The idea behind Emily was simple—younger people today tend to have conversations about everything via texts. The inspiration behind the program came from its creator’s own experience with his mother-in-law suffering a stroke and surviving. This event got Emily’s maker thinking about end of life plans and how few conversations people have concerning their last wishes. While death and incapacity seems far off when you are young, the reality is that accidents and illnesses can happen to anyone.

Chatbot Emily Makes It Easy to Discuss Difficult Issues

Chatbot Emily makes it easier to talk about those conversations that you generally avoid with your peers. Emily talks you through your estate planning options, including advance directives, wills, and funeral planning. Emily adapts to the pace of the conversation and can be paused as needed. A conversation will generally last 30 to 45 minutes and it is free to complete the basic service. The company intends to offer a referral service for further estate planning options.

Start Talking About Your End of Life Plans Today

Whether you start your discussion with a chatbot, your loved ones, or your estate planning lawyer, the important thing is that you begin thinking and talking about your estate plan today. Far too many Americans put off estate planning until it is too late, leaving your loved ones caught in a struggle to manage their finances and fulfill what they think you would have wanted. People of every age need to have a basic will and advance directives in place to protect their loved ones from the uncertainty of an intestate succession.